Comparative oxygen saturation measurements in hypobaric conditions.


The diagnosis and therapy altitude-related diseases essentially depends on the determination of peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). While up to 11% of height exposed individuals develop pulmonary edema (HAPE, high altitude pulmonary edema), have 53% of all mountain travelers from 3500 meters above sea level, symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS, acute mountain sickness) on [1,2]. Crucial to the development of AMS and HAPE is the decrease of the alveolar oxygen partial pressure due to height-related barometric pressure reduction.
It made two determinations of peripheral arterial oxygen saturation of 14 participants during a Elbrusexpedition (5642 meters). Due to weather conditions only at an altitude of 5218 meters was reached. The initial height was 2400 meters. Intermediates were in 3040, 3265, 3580 and 4075 meters. The average determined arterial oxygen saturation was by Nonin Onyx 89.7 ± 5.68%, and was significantly different (p <0.05) of the ascertained with SET SpO2 of 91.1 ± 5.60%. The pulse rate was not significantly different (p> 0.05). She was with Nonin Onyx 89.2 ± 17.4 beats per minute compared with the SET oximetry of 97.1 ± 19.1 / min. In the corresponding altitude regions arose in
Table 1 shown saturation values. The values differed in Student t test (p <0.05) from each other.


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